Ominous Transitions Seminar Series

Home/Uncategorized/Ominous Transitions Seminar Series

Ominous Transitions Seminar Series

$200.00

5 in stock

The tone of collective discourse has rapidly degenerated, damaging the forms and rituals that give coherence to our lives, cultures and professional disciplines contributing to a sense of communal and global unrest.  In these intimate Saturday morning seminars our desire is to nourish a spirit of reflection rather than repeating the sounds of panic and alarm, or pretend hopes. Stepping back from the present situation, we will reflect on the current moment through trans-disciplinary lenses including philosophy, theology, history, psychoanalysis, neuroscience, and anthropology.  Together we will seek new perspectives that may help us move into an open future.

5 in stock

Category:

Description

CEUs Goals & Objectives:

November 10, 2018

Exploring the Neurobiology of Relationship – The Roots of Security and Trauma

Seminar Leader:  Tony Stanton

CEU Objectives:
  1. To understand the history of research underpinning the neurobiology of relationship.
  2. To understand the neurobiology that stands behind successful therapeutic relationship and child development.
  3. To appreciate the ethical implications of negative child rearing and forced parent child separations.

Tony Stanton M.D. is an adult and child psychiatrist who has devoted the greater part of his career to directing and consulting with community mental health programs for adults, children, and adolescents. These have included inpatient and outpatient facilities, residential programs and programs for the developmentally disabled. He completed his training in Child Psychiatry at Langley Porter Neuropsychiatric Institute (UCSF) where he continued to serve as a member of the clinical staff (supervising residents and fellows in child psychiatry) until he moved to Washington State in 1989. He is board certified in adult and child psychiatry. He is particularly interested in the study of developmental neurobiology and the importance of the arts in the maintenance of human integrity.

December 8, 2018

The Revenge of the Golem: Psychology, Ethics and Technology

Seminar Leader: Eric Severson

CEU Objectives:
  1. To understand the historical and philosophical relationship humans have with technology.
  2. To understand the psychological impact of the digital mediation of human relationships through technological devices.
  3. To understand the moral and ethical dilemmas posed by the crisis in 21st century technological development.

Eric Severson is a philosopher specializing in the work of Emmanuel Levinas.  He is author of the books Levinas’s Philosophy of Time (Duquesne University Press, 2013) and Scandalous Obligation (Beacon Hill Press, 2011), and editor of several other works. He lives in Kenmore, Washington with his wife Misha and their three children, and teaches philosophy at Seattle University.

January 12, 2019

Militarization and Identity

Seminar Leaders:  Nicole Torres and Mylor Treneer

CEU Objectives:
  1. To understand the hardening of identity and the ethical challenges related to the “militarization of inner space.”
  2. To understand how static perceptions of racial identity relate to a “camp mentality” which is the prototype for fascist ideologies.
  3. To appreciate the ethical considerations related to the politics of identity in the United States.

Nicole is a medical anthropologist and clinical social worker. She is the author of Walls of Indifference: Immigration and the Militarization of the U.S. – Mexico Border.  Her research examined the social and psychological effects of militarization among borderland communities in Arizona.

Mylor E. Treneer, M.A. Education, is currently a Union Training Coordinator, with a 40 year career in labor relations and a life long interest in anthropology, philosophy and social justice.  He writes on these topics at selfstates.com. A former local union president and union business agent, the labor movement has been a source of “long circuits” for Mylor. He is still a member of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees and has been fortunate in his life to have also been a member of the United Steelworkers, the U.F.C.W. and the NEA. United we bargain, divided we beg.

February 9, 2019

Nihilism and the Affirmation of Life

Living the Death of God in Trump America

Seminar Leaders: Elizabeth Sikes and Tony Stanton

CEU objectives:

At the end of the seminar the participant should:

  1. Have a clear idea of the concept of nihilism.
  2. Know the history of the concept.
  3. Have an understanding of how the concept is relevant to the current ethical dilemmas facing our society.

Elizabeth Sikes, PhD, LMHC, is a practicing psychotherapist in Seattle and co-leader of Seattle University’s EcoSangha Zen meditation group. She earned her doctorate in philosophy from DePaul University after studying in Tübingen, Germany for four years on an Alexander von Humboldt German Chancellor Scholar Fellowship. In Tübingen she immersed herself in the mad brilliance of German poet and philosopher, Friedrich Hölderlin, and Greek tragedy, which combined studies in philosophy, artistic and poetic practice, and psychoanalysis. She was an adjunct professor for thirteen years at Seattle University, during which time she also earned an MA from their program in Existential-Phenomenological psychology. Elizabeth has a long-abiding interest in the conditions of human life, value, and meaning, and how they affect us personally and in our relationships with others, culture and the rest of the natural world. Elizabeth’s office is located at 506 2nd Ave, suite 1400, Seattle, WA 98104. Her email address is interconnectedcounseling@gmail.com.  To read more about her practice, writings, and public presentations, please refer to her website at www.interconnectedcounseling.com

Tony Stanton M.D. is an adult and child psychiatrist who has devoted the greater part of his career to directing and consulting with community mental health programs for adults, children, and adolescents. These have included inpatient and outpatient facilities, residential programs and programs for the developmentally disabled. He completed his training in Child Psychiatry at Langley Porter Neuropsychiatric Institute (UCSF) where he continued to serve as a member of the clinical staff (supervising residents and fellows in child psychiatry) until he moved to Washington State in 1989. He is board certified in adult and child psychiatry. He is particularly interested in the study of developmental neurobiology and the importance of the arts in the maintenance of human integrity.

About the New School for Analytical Psychology

Our School embraces education as a never-ending dialogical process that does not hold fast to a single theory or ideology. Our approach to knowledge is one that honors the ancient yet emphasizes our embeddedness in a contemporary cultural context. An ethical obligation to the ‘other’ is a prime concern.

Our profession faces complex conditions of suffering and evolution, and each journey has a unique destiny that cannot be known in advance. The inherent ambiguity of our field creates anxiety in its practitioners, and there is a tendency to withdraw into defensive bastions of theory and practice. The New School group shares a deep concern about the fundamentalist tendencies in all analytic schools. We value the scholarship and clinical approaches of multiple traditions with their unique perspectives on our ever-fascinating, ever-evolving field of reflective endeavor.